lowell massachusetts

Complete Game Physical Therapy Patient of the Month: Pete

IMG-5436.jpeg

Complete Game Physical Therapy introduces our patient of the month, Pete.

Pete came to us following a hip injury that had been giving him issues since the fall. Pete is a Andover High School graduate in his first year at University of New Hampshire where he is a member of the varsity lacrosse team. He had been rehabbing and resting is hip for much of the fall lacrosse season but it continued to limit his performance on the field. Upon returning home at the end of the semester Pete came to Complete Game Physical Therapy to focus on getting back to 100% before having to return to UNH for what will be is first season with the team.

Pete’s hard work both in the clinic with his exercises and compliance to his prescribed home exercise program allowed him to steadily progress back to game speed. As a freshman varsity athlete at UNH Pete continually said that he wanted to be able to complete all activities from day one of practice in order to try and compete for some playing time as a freshman.

Now he is able to sprint, cut, and all complete sport related activities at 100% effort. With Pete heading back up to school with would like to honor him as our patient of the month. It was a pleasure working with an athlete with such strong determination and we are glad we were part of your rehab process.
Good luck this season Pete and the UNH Wildcats!

Complete Game Physical Therapy: Patient of the Month, Fran

IMG_2085.jpg

Complete Game Physical Therapy introduces our patient of the month, Fran.

Fran came to us following her hip replacement surgery. As you can imagine, recovery from this surgery is a process and patients gradually add more to their daily routines.

Fran worked very hard at her exercises in our clinic and she was sure to follow her prescribed home exercise program. She was focused on getting back to her favorite activities. “I wanted to get back to cooking, going out with my friends, and playing with my grandchildren,” she said. “When I came here, I couldn’t go up or down the stairs regularly or even make my famous meatloaf because bending to lift it out of the oven was too painful.”

Now she is back to 100% and doing everything that is important to her! And her family can enjoy her wonderful cooking again.

It was a pleasure to have you in our clinic, Fran, and we are so glad we were part of your recovery process.


WARM-UP Before the Chill by Dr. Andrew Levanti, DPT, ATC

18bestspan-articleLarge.jpg

The days are getting shorter and colder which can make sticking to your training program tough. Cold weather training can also lead to unwanted injuries, slowing down your progression and keeping you from participating in your favorite winter sports. A good dynamic warm up prior to activity is key to keeping your body healthy. Not warming up prior to your workout can leave your muscles feeling tighter throughout the workout and at an increased risk of injury. Below is a quick way to warm up and get keep you going through those chilly workouts.

Get the Blood Flowing:

Getting your heart rate up and the blood flowing to the muscles is the first step to a good warm up. A review of literature published in Sports Medicine concluded that increasing muscle temperature prior to activity can improve performance by decreasing the stiffness of muscles and joints, increase the transmission rate of nerve impulses, and producing a positive change of the force-velocity relationship (Bishop, 2003). Increasing blood flow and muscle temperature can be done in a few ways and really doesn’t require much space at all. If you have a stationary bike or elliptical at home you can hop on there for a quick 3-5 minutes at low intensity to get your heart rate up and blood flowing. If not, give these a try:

  1. Jumping Jacks:

    1. Start position: standing with your hands at your side.

    2. Movement: Start doing jumping jacks, raising your hands over head and jumping with your feet wide at the same time.

  2. Burpees:

    1. Start position: standing with your hands at your side

    2. Movement: Bring hands on the floor in front of you, then kick both of your legs backward, landing into a plank position. Perform a push up, then hop your legs back in toward your hands. Jump off the ground raising your arms overhead, then gently land, and repeat.

  3. Mountain climbers:

    1. Start position: Push-up position.

    2. Movement: Quickly alternate bringing your knees to your chest.

Dynamic Stretching:

The next step to a good warm is dynamic stretching to loosen up the muscles in preparation for the work out. A review of literature published in Current Sports Medicine Reports by the American College of Sports Medicine recommended dynamic stretching immediately prior to activity for a majority of athletes (Peck, 2016). Dynamic stretching consists of functional movements to bring the muscles into a lengthened position. They differ from static stretching in that the stretch is not held for prolonged amount of time. Once again, a ton of space is not needed to get this done in the house before heading out into the cold. It can be done in a hallway or even right in the living room. Here are a few dynamic stretches to try out.

  1. Walking Knee Hugs:

    1. Start position: Standing in a open and flat area.

    2. Movement: While walking lift one knee up to your chest and hug it with your arms. Hold 2-3 seconds, release, and take 2 steps, then repeat on the other side. Repeat 10-15 times of each side.

  2. Walking Quad Stretch:

    1. Start position: Standing in a open and flat area.

    2. Movement: While walking, bend one knee bringing your ankle to your bottom grabbing it with your hand. Hold 2-3 seconds, release, and take 2 steps, then repeat on the other side. Repeat 10-15 times of each side.

  3. Frankenstein's:

    1. Start position: Standing in a open and flat area.

    2. Movement: While walking kick one leg straight out in front of you hip high while reaching with your opposite arm to touch your toes on the leg you are kicking up. Take 2 steps, the repeat on other side. Repeat 10-15 times of each side.

  4. Walking Lunge Twist:

    1. Start position: Standing with your hands behind your head in a open and flat area.

    2. Movement: Take a large step forward, lowering into a lunge position with your knees bent to 90 degree angles. Keeping your chest up, twist your trunk to the left, then right, and back to center. Then raise yourself up and take a step forward with your other leg without letting your foot touch the ground in between and repeat motion. Repeat 10-15 times of each side.

  5. Walking Hamstring/Calf Stretch:

    1. Start position: Standing in a open, and flat area.

    2. Movement: Take a step forward placing your heel on the ground in front of you with your leg straight. Slowly bend forward at your hips with your back flat reaching your hands toward your toes until you feel a gentle stretch in the back of your thigh and calf. Then keeping your back flat return to as standing position as you reach your hands over your head before bringing them back to your side. Take 2 steps and repeat motion on other side. Repeat 10-15 times of each side.

At Complete Game Physical Therapy injury prevention is one of our primary goals. We provide wellness movement screens to ensure that your body is moving properly and efficiently. With the results of the screen we are able to provide you with a set of corrective exercises to improve your mobility and keep your body moving the way it should. If you are are interested in a wellness movement screen or have any questions please contact us at 978-710-7204 or via email at alevanti@completegamept.com

*Bishop, D. (2003). Warm Up II. Sports Medicine, 33(7), pp.483-498.

*Peck, E., Chomko, G., Gaz, D. and Farrell, A. (2014). The Effects of Stretching on Performance. Current Sports Medicine Reports, 13(3), pp.179-185.


Complete Game Physical Therapy: Patient of the Month, Kimberly Herbert

IMG_3060.jpeg

Complete Game Physical Therapy welcomes our Patient of the Month, Kimberly Herbert.

Kimberly is quite an athlete! While training for her Ironman Competition, she tore her hamstring.

“I was devastated, and unsure if I was going to be able to make it to the starting line, let alone cross the finish line!” Kim says about her feelings after her injury. There was a silver-ling, though. “Due the expert knowledge and compassion of Complete Game Physical Therapy,  I was not only able to compete, but also crush my goals!”

We focused on a personalized treatment plan for Kim and that seems to make all the difference in her recovery. “Being a multi sport athlete, it was important that my therapist understood the need for personalized treatment plans.  They were able to help me focus on what I could do, not what I couldn't do. I am extremely thankful to them and will without a doubt go to them again!”


10797559904_IMG_5419.JPG

Thank you, Kim! We are so proud of what you accomplished and wish you many more competitions in the future.



Hitting for Power and Pitching Velocity… It’s All in the Hips!

“It’s all in the hips.”  Not just a great line from the movie Happy Gilmore but also a great way to create more power hitting a baseball and increase pitching velocity in a safe manner.  I had the great pleasure of taking the Titleist Performance Institute (@mytpi) certification course over the last few days and they spend a lot of time talking about how pelvic tilt relates to power in the golf swing.  I of course immediately think of how it relates to baseball and with golf and baseball both being rotational sports they relate pretty closely. There must be something to this if TPI is currently training the top 60 golfers in the world!

Pelvic Tilt

Pelvic tilt is simply the position of the pelvis or hip bones in relation to the ground when standing.  An anterior tilt can be pictured as simply an increased arch in the lower back. A posterior tilt is the opposite and decreased arch in lower back or flattening of the spine.  A neutral spine is the spot right in between the two.


how-to-fix-anterior-pelvic-tilt.jpg

How Pelvic Tilt Occurs in Throwing and Hitting

When our front leg lands as we throw or our back hip rotates around as we hit our pelvis is in an anterior tilt.  Doing this allow our hips and shoulders to rotate separately from each other to help create power. This leaves us in a position of lower back extension or increased arch.  As we come to release point in throwing or contact point in hitting we need to get out of that arch of the lower back and move into a more neutral or even slightly posterior pelvic tilt.  This allows us to use the power we generated with our lower half effectively and deliver it to the ball. Eric Cressey (@ericCressey) and Matt Blake do a great job of giving a detailed explanation of this in a blog post here: https://ericcressey.com/pitching-performance-trunk-position-foot-strike-1.

What We See in the Clinic

At Complete Game PT we have started off season screenings for area youth baseball players and we are seeing a lot of trouble with control of pelvic tilt.  Whether it’s due to poor anterior core strength, poor glute strength, tight hip flexors or just poor motor control kids have a really hard time moving from an anterior pelvic tilt to posterior.  This can lead to poor performance due to lack of power hitting or throwing or even worse injury to the back or hips. Problems with core control have also been related to shoulder and elbow injuries in throwers.

Pelvic Tilt Test

A simple test you can do to see if you or your athlete has trouble with controlling pelvic tilt is to stand in your hitting stride or pitching stride position and simply see if you can tilt your pelvis by arching your low back, then flattening your low back, then try to find the neutral position right in between.  If you have trouble doing this stand with your back against a wall with your feet about 18 inches from the wall and try to flatten your back against the wall. If you have trouble with that next step is to try doing the same thing laying flat on your back with your knees bend and feet flat on the floor. You should be able to move from anterior tilt to posterior and back to neutral easily and smoothly.

This test turns into a great exercise to work on if you have difficulty with the pelvic tilt in any of the positions mentioned above.  It is also a great example of how problems further down the chain like hip and core control can relate to poor performance or even injury further up the chain in the shoulder or elbow.  If you have any questions or would like to get you or your athlete assessed give us a call at Complete Game PT 978-710-7204 or email me at gcrossman@completegampt.com.




Tips to Help Prevent Injury for the Ex Ballplayer Returning to the Field

58c7f0d2e665570916c653ec.png

After a few years away from playing baseball, I’ve decided to join a men’s adult baseball fall league or, as my kids affectionately call it, the “old man baseball league.”  Having seen many former players who have returned to baseball or softball in the PT clinic over the years, I thought I would put together some tips to help reduce the likelihood of injury.  Here are a few things to keep in mind if you plan to return to the field.

  1. Warm up.  We may remember the days where we could just show up to the field and get right out there and play.  Unfortunately, as we age, those days are over. Having some form of warm up is key to preventing injuries such as muscle strains and tears.  Do some light jogging and follow with gentle stretching or a dynamic warm up such as body weight squats and lunges to get the blood flowing and loosen up your muscles before you play.

  2. Be careful with sprinting.  As we age, we lose muscle mass, particularly the fast twitch muscle fibers that are used with sprinting type activities.  Combine that with tight hamstrings due to sitting at a desk all day and you have the perfect situation for hamstring tears.  Don’t let your first sprint be when you are trying to leg out a double. Practice some sprints before you play by slowly progressing your sprinting.  Start at 50% speed, increase to 75%, and then build to full speed.

  3. Build up throwing slowly.  Just as you should increase your sprint gradually, you should build your throwing slowly as well.  Overhead throwing is not a natural motion for the body and, again, if you sit at a desk for much of the day or just generally have bad posture, the throwing motion is even less natural.  When you return to throwing, slowly build the number and distance of throws you make. If you start to feel pain in your shoulder or elbow, stop, get some ice on it and rest. If the pain doesn’t go away, see a medical professional.  I’ve seen many people who returned to throwing after a long lay off, tried to throw through pain and ended up with shoulder impingement or rotator cuff tears.

These tips are not only helpful for baseball but also soccer, basketball or even playing back yard touch football.  Follow these tips to help stay injury free and on the field!

 At Complete Game Physical Therapy we help athletes and active individuals of all ages get back to the sports and activities they love without missing valuable playing time or losing their competitive advantage.  For more information or to make an appointment call 978-710-7204 or email Greg at gcrossman@completegamept.com.

Complete Game Physical Therapy Welcomes Dr. Andrew Levanti

CGBLogANdrews.jpg

Complete Game Physical Therapy welcomes our new Physical Therapist, Dr. Andrew Levanti. Dr. Levanti will be starting to see patients in September and we are taking appointments now.

Dr. Andrew Levanti, DPT, ATC has practiced physical therapy for the past year and has been a certified athletic trainer for the past 4 years. He completed his undergraduate in Athletic Training at Stony Brook University in New York prior to continuing his education at UMass Lowell graduating with his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree in 2017. During his time at UMass Lowell he served as the Head Athletic Trainer for Club Sports. For the past year he has been working as a physical therapist in a sports orthopedic clinic in New Jersey. Andy’s passion is in sports medicine with special interest in shoulder and knee injuries. When not in the clinic he enjoys mountain biking, skiing, and enjoying the outdoors. Andy is very excited to continue to grow his career at Complete Game Physical Therapy!

5 Signs Your Back Pain May Be More Than An Ache

dc-Cover-8k1jv17dmslf7btkqc9giq2121-20170813230051.Medi.jpeg

We’ve all done it, you wake up with a sore back after doing some yard work or being out playing with the kids and figure it’s just an ache and will go away.  This may be the case but what if it’s not? Today I wanted to give some examples of instances where that ache in the back could be something more significant.

  1. Pain radiating down the leg- if you have pain coming down your leg which seems to start in your low back there is likely some nerve involvement.  The nerve can be irritated at the nerve root near your spine or more distally, either way this is more than just a sore back.

  2. Severe pain- any time you have pain that is severe in nature it is likely more than just some normal post activity soreness.

  3. Numbness, tingling or legs “giving out”- these are signs of more significant nerve damage.

  4. Pain that seems to be getting worse- a normal back ache should resolve within a few days of relative rest.  If not you may have something more going on.

  5. Recurring episodes of back pain- if your back ache keeps recurring there is likely something more going on.

For the symptoms above your back problems probably aren’t going to go away on their own and you should see a medical professional.  Keep in mind though that this is not an all inclusive list and there are other instances (like recent unexplained weight loss or unremitting night pain) that you should contact your doctor.

Back pain is not unusual.  As a matter of fact 8 out of 10 Americans will experience back pain in their lifetime.  Seeing a physical therapist can be one of the best ways to help with that back ache and make sure it doesn’t turn into something more significant.  A PT will sit down with you, get your history and figure out the best plan to not only reduce your pain but also keep it from coming back in the future.

At Complete Game Physical Therapy we specialize in the treatment of back pain and can help you take control of your back problems today. Visit our website or call our Lowell office at 978-710-7204 to make an appointment.

Complete Game Patient of the Month: Mackenzie

image1.jpeg

Complete Game Physical Therapy is pleased to introduce our Patient of the Month, Mackenzie.

Mackenzie is a high school freshman athlete who is both a softball and volleyball player and had labrum surgery . She saw Greg at the Nor'Easters facility for 2-3 months prior to the surgery when she had trouble throwing and came back again about 2 months after surgery. Now after four months, she is almost back to normal. 

Mackenzie, we are so glad you are pleased with your experience here at Complete Game. We loved working with you.