youth

Complete Game Physical Therapy: 2018 In Review

41876404_500700397006991_856714532372873216_n (1).jpg

2018 was a great year here at Complete Game Physical Therapy! We completed the move from our Tewksbury, MA location to our new location here in Lowell. As we settled in, we were able to concentrate on expanding and continuing to provide the best physical therapy services to all patients. Here are just some of the highlights from our year!

We have two new full-time staff members. Bonnie is our receptionist and admin and is the first face that most people see when they come through the door. Dr. Andrew Levanti, DPT, ATC joined us in August and sees patients along with Greg. The additions of Bonnie and Andy have contributed to our success this year!

37994140_462591937484504_8663978556872720384_n.jpg

We have cultivated exciting partnerships with the Lowell Jr Spinners Baseball, Mill City Volleyball, Boston Jr Rangers Hockey, Dracut High School Baseball, Northern Essex Community College Baseball organizations. In addition, we made some great connections with local fitness centers and gyms including New England Strength Performance, Choice Fitness, J&K Custom Fitness and Zone Fitness.

42242357_502583163485381_2951939771389181952_n.png

Greg and Andy currently write columns for the Tewksbury and Wilmington Town Crier to give readers a better understanding of physical therapy and treatments.

We continue to focus on and expand our youth sports injury prevention services with screenings for area youth sports organizations and to speak to youth sports organizations about youth sports injury and injury prevention.

48266562_546010402475990_2076965138312724480_n (1).jpg
44946638_521304354946595_8589890229282799616_n.jpg

As 2018 comes to a close, we are excited about the upcoming year! We hope that you all enjoyed a very Happy Holiday! Be sure to follow us in 2019 as Greg, Bonnie and Andy share news about Complete Game!

Keeping Healthy in the Baseball/Softball Off Season

81754716-min-1.jpg

Though the winter is in full swing and it may seem way too early to be thinking about the baseball or softball season, many players and teams will have started their offseason training.  Here in the northeast, indoor training facilities are filling up fast with players getting ready for next season. Check out these tips if you or your child is starting offseason training.

Screenshot (231).png

Training Considerations for Youth Baseball and Softball

Ages 12 and Under

A research review published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine in 2017, entitled “Sport Specialization at an Early Age Can Increase Injury Risk”, not only found a higher rate of injury in those that specialize early, but also found that those who waited to specialize tended to reach higher levels of athletic achievement.  Playing multiple sports, especially at younger ages, has clear benefits.

Be careful though.  Playing 3-4 sports in the same season is not necessarily beneficial and can, in fact, lead to overuse injuries or burnout.  We often see kids (and their well intended parents who let them play 3-4 sports in the same season) in the PT clinic with overuse type injuries (tendonitis, muscle strains, etc.).  Pick and choose what you play so as not to over do it.

Strength and conditioning training at this age is helpful, but should be done only under observation with a trainer who is used to working with children.  Training at these ages should not focus on traditional “weight lifting” and instead should focus more on the A, B, Cs (Agility, Balance and Coordination).

Ages 13-14

This age group is a challenge.  We see more injuries in the clinic in this age group than any other group of athletes.  For baseball players, this is the age when they move to the big diamond. The longer throws in particular can be very taxing on their arms.  It is important at this age that athletes get in the gym and start some sort of strength training to help withstand the longer throws. They should also consider working with a coach on throwing mechanics.  We often see kids whose poor throwing mechanics become problematic when they move from small diamond to big diamond and have to make longer throws.

Softball field dimensions do not change as much, but this is the age where the female body begins to change and girls are at a higher risk for ACL injury.  The hips tend to widen, leaving the knees at an angle that is more susceptible to injury. Strength training programs or even ACL injury prevention programs can help reduce the risk of injury.

Ages 15+

This older age group should be involved in a more traditional strength and conditioning program.  Be sure, however, that your athlete is working with someone who has experience training “overhead athletes” like baseball or softball players.  There are many considerations that should be taken into account with this group. For example, because of the high level of stress that is placed on the front of the shoulder, care should be taken not to overstress the front of the shoulder in the weight room as well.

Another consideration with this group of athletes is that though it is still beneficial to play multiple sports, these athletes should be getting themselves ready for baseball or softball prior to the start of the season.  In the northeast, high school tryouts are typically in March and games often begin a week or two later. This is not enough time to prepare the body for high demand activities such as pitching. Athletes should be doing some throwing such as an interval throwing program to prepare themselves along with a strength and conditioning program.

At Complete Game Physical Therapy we help athletes and active individuals of all ages get back to the sports and activities they love without missing valuable playing time or losing their competitive advantage.  For more information or to make an appointment call 978-710-7204 or email Greg at gcrossman@completegamept.com.





3 Keys to Proper Cool Down

I was recently approached by a local youth basketball coach who asked “I have heard so much about the importance of proper warm up before practice and games, but what about cool down?” What a great question. Though I often inform my patients and athletes about the importance of proper stretching and cooling down after working out, I had never been asked by a coach how to properly cool down his or her team. Here are the 3 keys to proper cool down.

1.)  Injury Prevention

At the end of practice or following games is the perfect time to do a few exercises to help reduce the likelihood for injury.  Most non contact injuries, be it ankle sprains or ACL tears, occur when athletes are fatigued. Performing some simple balance exercises can help improve control and reduce the likelihood for injury.

Single Leg Balance:

Simply standing on one leg will help with balance and neuromuscular control.  Focus should be on proper alignment, keeping knee in line with the foot and maintaining an athletic position. 

Balance and Reach:

balance and reach.jpg

Balancing while reaching out with the other leg challenges balance and control even further.  Focus should continue to be on maintaining proper alignment and control with the balance leg.

2.)  Light Static Stretching

Doing some light static stretching is a key part of proper cool down, particularly with youth athletes.  Youth athletes are often going through “growth spurts” where the athlete’s muscle length doesn’t always keep up with bone growth.  This often leads to problems such as Sever’s disease (heel pain) or Osgood-schlatter’s (knee pain).  Here are a couple of stretches that can help with this.

Quad Stretch:

Calf Stretch:

3.)  Breathing

The third key to proper cool down is performing some deep breathing.  During practice and games athlete’s sympathetic nervous system gets fired up.  This is the fight or flight response of the nervous system that can is helpful when in stressful or competitive situations, but can leave the athlete feeling anxious or stressed after.  Taking 10-15 deep breaths will help athletes “wind down” and get in a more relaxed state of mind.  This is also a great opportunity for the coach to talk about the positive things that happened during the practice or game.

This is by no means a comprehensive list of everything that should be included in a cool down, but a few items that can be easily implemented.  For more information on this subject please refer to Mike Robertson at http://robertsontrainingsystems.com/. He does a great job of getting really in depth about this subject.  For more info on breathing, which is helpful both in training and daily life, Brett Jones does a great job reviewing it in the video that can be found here: http://www.functionalmovement.com/articles/Screening/2015-08-19_breathing_corrective_strategies_techniques.

 

If you are interested in having Complete Game Physical Therapy perform a youth injury risk screening on your athletes, or are interested in any of our services, contact us at 978-710-7204. 

Low Back Pain in the Youth Athlete

At Complete Game Physical Therapy, we have performed injury risk screens over the last two weekends for Storm Club Lacrosse, a local girls lacrosse program.  During the screening, we identified several athletes who required further evaluation for lower back pain.  This screening, along with a couple baseball players who see me due to lower back problems, made me think about the prevalence of lower back pain in youth athletes.

Though low back pain is more often associated with an older, sedentary population, it is actually quite common in youth athletes.  An estimated 10-15% of young athletes will experience low back problems.  With over 30 million kids participating in sports, this is no small number.  Here is a brief review of common causes of lower back problems in youth athletes and some prevention strategies to help reduce the likelihood of low back pain occurring.

Posture

Though the exact role of posture in relation to lower back pain has been debated, it is certain that poor posture will lead to problems.  A good way to think about posture is through a comparison to the alignment of your car.  You may be able to get away with your car being out of alignment for a while, but eventually misalignment will cause problems. 

Posture problems can generally be simplified to either overly extended or rounded.  Over extended (or lordotic posture) is often associated with athletes and, in particular, gymnasts, figure skaters and cheerleaders.  Rounded posture is what we commonly think of as slouched posture.  It is especially common in kids who spend a great deal of time playing video games, on computers/phones or watching television.  Either way, I like to simplify posture and tell my patients to just think of keeping your ear, shoulder and hip in line when standing and sitting.  You can also do some gentle shoulder blade pinches to help remind you to maintain good posture, especially when sitting for long periods.

Flexibility

Flexibility can certainly be an issue with youth athletes.  Combine the sitting we mentioned above with the possibility of recent growth spurts where muscle length may not keep up with bone growth and you end up with muscle tightness.  It is particularly common in two muscle groups: the hip flexors and the hamstrings.  

Hip Flexor Stretch

This can be particularly helpful with an athlete with more extended posture.

Hamstring Stretch

This can be helpful with an athlete with rounded posture.

Strength

Strengthening is also important, as many athletes with back pain tend to have weak core musculature.  I will review two exercises:  the pelvic tilt and back bridge

Pelvic Tilt

This exercise is accomplished by gently pressing the lower back down into the floor as you lay on your back.  The pelvic tilt has fallen out of favor with some who prefer to teach more of a neutral isometric exercise.  The pelvic tilt can, however, be very useful, especially with the athlete with extended posture.

Back Bridge

This is a great exercise to strengthen the core and glutes which can help take pressure off your lower back.

The exercises and stretches listed above may be helpful in reducing the likelihood of experiencing lower back pain and keep an athlete on the field.  This information is by no means, however, a complete review of lower back pain.  If you (or your athlete) are having lower back pain, you should be evaluated by a medical professional.

Thank you for reading.  Please sign up for my newsletter to receive more injury prevention tips.